July 25, 2021

Harry Crump, the judge who saved the Twins — and his amazing resume (Twinkie Town)


After the terrorist attacks of September, 2001, baseball was widely credited with helping a grieving America “get back to normal” (or, really, have something else to watch on TV besides more replayed news clips of horrible building explosions). The World Series that year was an all-time classic, with one team representing a city targeted by those attacks, culminating in a thrilling Game 7. Baseball’s greatest ever super-tall pitcher, Randy Johnson, got the last four Yankees out after throwing 104 pitches one day before.

And, exactly two days later, MLB owners voted 28-2 to kill two baseball teams because those owners wanted more free taxpayer money. (Say what you like about then-commissioner Bud Selig, he had a sixth sense for how to do almost the least appealing thing in the most public way at the worst possible moment.) Those two teams were the Montreal Expos and Minnesota Twins.

The plan was stalled on November 16 by Hennepin County judge Harry Crump, who essentially ruled that since the Twins had a lease to play in the Metrodome during 2002, they were obligated to do so, and MLB couldn’t say a dang thing about it. Crump’s decision cleverly mentioned that the…

Read “Harry Crump, the judge who saved the Twins — and his amazing resume” at Twinkie Town